White Magic

by duncanr

A distinction is generally drawn between ‘white’ (= good, benevolent) magic and ‘black’ (= bad, malevolent) magic.

For Albino’s living in Burundi, however, it is a distinction having no meaning.

Albinism is a congenital lack in the skin, eyes and hair of melanin pigment which protects against the sun’s ultraviolet rays.

In parts of Africa there is a belief that albinos’ flesh brings luck in love, life and business – a belief fostered and promoted by witch doctors. This has led to a thriving trade in albino body parts – especially in Tanzania.

The trade has now spread to neighbouring Burundi, with the small population of Albinos’s being hunted down and killed – their bodies hacked and mutilated and arms, legs, and genitalia sold to witch doctors in Tanzania.

Albino’s fearing for their lives have fled their homes and gone into hiding

Read more here . . .

17 Comments to “White Magic”

  1. Bruce posted about the Tanzanian problem some months ago

    http://brucemhood.wordpress.com/2009/02/21/stop-the-killing-of-tanzanian-albinos/

    This included a link to an online petition. I have a rather jaundiced view of petitions (online or otherwise), as I don’t know if they actually do any good. However, if you wish to put your name down to try to stop such horrors, then here’s your chance.

    Like

  2. …and we’re celebrating 40 years since man first landed on the moon.

    What a fucked-up, crazy world we live in!

    Like

  3. Oi!
    Nobbly, where’s me flag?

    Like

  4. ive’ got me ooman rites, like innit?

    Like

  5. dat guatelama chick is one big fat hoe.

    Like

  6. she dun tol me bout duncan too.

    all trahsers and tiny haggis

    (Can we stop now? – I’ve lost the plot!)

    Like

  7. No worries mate.

    I lost the plot years ago.

    Like

  8. i hadn’t heard of this news story. that’s horrible. thanks for sharing a real eye opener!

    Like

  9. I’ve heard of this before. It’s barbaric.

    Education, that’s what’s needed. Let’s lift this world out of its history of superstition and folklore.

    OK, I’m a dreamer.

    Like

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