Misheard Names

by duncanr

[Click on Pic to enlarge]

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Names are tricky things. They often carry associations in our mind (I bet there was a fall off in the number of newborn british girls being named ‘Myra’ after the ‘Moors Murders’ case) that do not ‘fit’ the personality, character, or appearance of the bearer. That applies not just to humans, but to animals too.  For instance, calling a Rottweiler ‘Nigel’ or a Chihuahua  ‘Rambo’ will occasion a few raised eyebrows and questioning looks !

In naming dogs, one also has to be careful . . .not to pick a name which might be misheard as something else

For example, I imagine it probably seemed appropriate (and amusing) to call a small dog that barks a lot ‘Yelp’ – who could have foreseen that decision would result in twenty police officers, many with police dogs, as well as a team of three mountain rescue workers being called out to scour the area around an abandoned mine near Bridge of Allan, Stirlingshire, Scotland

http://tinyurl.com/pgjerwj

Now, you may well be wondering what the photo at the top of this post has to do with this story. It is not a picture of the dog ‘Yelp’ or it’s owner. It is not a picture of Bridge of Allan. So why have I put it up here?

The pic is of an island off the west coast of Scotland and the cottage where I used to live

The stretch of water you see in the pic separating Luing from the neighbouring island of Seil is called Cuan Sound.

Allowing a young child to choose the name of a new pup seemed like a good idea at the time and her choice of Cuan (pronounced koo-an), clever and its origin understood by folk on the island but trust me, it was bloody embarrassing and I got some right black looks from folk when we were in Edinburgh and I was trying to get that bloody black labrador to come back to me by shouting what sounded to their ears as ‘Coon’

15 Comments to “Misheard Names”

  1. Now what breed of dog would suit the name ‘Cameron’?

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  2. MrsN used to work for Greater Manchester Police some years ago. (I know it’s embarrassing, but we try not to talk about it…)

    She rescued a small pup that had been handed in at Rochdale nick, and wanted to name it something related to the police.

    My suggestion of ‘Plod’ didn’t go down well, and her idea of ‘Bobby’ seemed too tame. I asked round at work, and got the excellent suggestion of ‘Fascist scumbag’. However, I couldn’t quite see myself shouting this in the park at night when the dog had legged it into the woods. I’d have had hordes of knuckle-dragging skinheads clutching partially inflated bags of Bostik heading in my direction.

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  3. Yes, I would be embarassed, too….

    Should that be ‘rescued’ or ‘resusced’?

    How about ‘corrupt freemasonic bullyboy’?

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  4. “The pic is of an island off the west coast of Scotland and the cottage where I used to live”.

    What did you do for a job, Dunc? Or was it before you blew your millions?

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    • Psst, sticky . . . don’t say I told you, but it was an offshore prison.

      Say no more ! ! !

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    • Not as isolated as it might appear from the pic, sticky

      short, but tricky, ferry crossing from Luing to Seil

      and Seil itself is connected to mainland Scotland by the famous ‘bridge over the Atlantic’ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clachan_Bridge)

      from which it is but 10-12 miles to Oban

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      • Wow, the Clachan Sound really is narrow – no wonder those whales had problems! Must have been a great commute, at least in daylight. It’s not far from Mull, which I visited a couple of times about 25 years ago, one of them for a week’s sailing.

        Come to think of it, I haven’t seen any of NobblySan’s pics from Arran, yet.

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        • ‘where is the bridge over the atlantic?’ often appears as a question in pub quizzes 😆

          there is a hotel on Seil – just before you hit the clachan bridge – called the tighnabruaich hotel

          from the gaelic, tighnabruaich means house of the trousers

          after the 1745 rebellion, wearing the kilt was punishable by death so tradition has it that when islanders from luing or seil were crossing to mainland Scotland they would change out of their kilts and don trousers at the hotel/pub just before the clachan bridge

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